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Traveling has become a global pastime that in the previous decade, the number of local travelers has grown exponentially.

An interior view of the first-class compartment of a commercial passenger plane, a Boeing, 1950s. (Authenticated News/Getty Images)
An interior view of the first-class compartment of a commercial passenger plane, a Boeing, 1950s. (Authenticated News/Getty Images)

What used to be a niche market for the privileged set has now become an industry patronized by everyone.
But with the advent of budget airlines, the dress code for traveling has gone down as well. Travelers before wore their Sunday’s best when flying. Today, street wear like flip-flops, sando shirts and shorts are very much de rigueur.

“I thought a trench coat was tantamount to travel wear. But when I started travelling myself, my perceptions altered; especially when I went into the fashion industry,” shared fashion designer and celebrated chef Danny Dela Cuesta.

“Also, when traveling, I had problems with space, lifting luggage, security checks, and the like. They dangled all around and created much fuss,” he added.

Perhaps, these numerous SOPs are what made airline passengers dress down. At security checks, males were required to remove shoes and belts. So to make security check a breeze, why not discard all that for sneakers and shorts.

“I realized that what can lessen the bother is to wear something decent, light and functional for changing weather patterns but stylish enough to project my personal image and style,” enthused Dela Cuesta.

“But times have changed and clothes have been too relaxed that sometimes it is tricky to differentiate what’s functional travel wear compared with those worn at home,” he continued.

So always remember, as Dela Cuesta suggests, “decent, lightweight apparel that can make one feel mobile or flexible to changing temperature & space” is still the best way to fly.

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